The objective of this study was to compare fatty acid weight percentages and cholesterol concentrations of longissimus dorsi (LD), semitendinosus (ST), and supraspinatus (SS) muscles (n = 10 for each) of range bison (31 mo of age), feedlot-finished bison (18 mo of age), range beef cows (4 to 7 yr of age), feedlot steers (18 mo of age), free-ranging cow elk (3 to 5 yr of age), and chicken breast. Lipids were analyzed by capillary GLC. Total saturated fatty acids (SFA) were greater (P < 0.01) in range bison than in feedlot bison and were greater (P < 0.01) in SS of range beef cattle than in feedlot steers. Muscles of elk and range bison were similar (P > 0.05) in SAT. In LD, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were highest (P < 0.01) for elk and range bison and lowest (P < 0.01) for feedlot steers within each muscle. Range bison and range beef cows had greater (P < 0.01) PUFA in LD and ST than feedlot bison or steers, respectively. Range-fed animals had higher (P < 0.01) n-3 fatty acids than feedlot-fed animals or chicken breast. Chicken breast n-6 fatty acids were greater (P < 0.01) than for muscles from bison, beef, or elk. Elk had higher (P < 0.01) n-6 fatty acids than bison or beef cattle; however, range-fed animals had higher (P < 0,01) n-6 fatty acids than feedlot-fed animals in ST. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, 18:2cis9, trans-11) in LD was greatest (P < 0.01) for range beef cows (0.4%), and lowest for chicken breast and elk (mean = 0.1%). In ST, CLA was greatest (P < 0.01) for range and feedlot bison and range beef cows (mean = 0.4%) and lowest for elk and chicken breast (mean = 0.1%). Also, SS CLA was greatest (P < 0.01) for range beef cows (0.5%) and lowest for chicken breast (0.1%). Mean total fatty acid concentration (g/100 g tissue) for all muscles was highest (P < 0.01) for feedlot bison and feedlot cattle and lowest (P < 0.01) for range bison, range beef cows, elk, and chicken. Chicken breast cholesterol (mg/100 g tissue) was higher (P < 0.01) than LD and ST cholesterol, which were lowest (P < 0.01; 43.8) for range bison and intermediate for the other species. Cholesterol in SS was highest (P < 0.01) for feedlot bison and steers, which were similar to chicken breast (mean = 61.2 vs 52.8 for the mean of the other species). We conclude that lipid composition of bison muscle varies with feeding regimen, and range-fed bison had muscle lipid composition similar to that of forage-fed beef cows and wild elk.

COMPARISON OF MUSCLE FATTY ACID PROFILES AND CHOLESTEROL CONCENTRATIONS OF BISON, BEEF CATTLE, ELK, AND CHICKEN

MAIORANO, Giuseppe
2002

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare fatty acid weight percentages and cholesterol concentrations of longissimus dorsi (LD), semitendinosus (ST), and supraspinatus (SS) muscles (n = 10 for each) of range bison (31 mo of age), feedlot-finished bison (18 mo of age), range beef cows (4 to 7 yr of age), feedlot steers (18 mo of age), free-ranging cow elk (3 to 5 yr of age), and chicken breast. Lipids were analyzed by capillary GLC. Total saturated fatty acids (SFA) were greater (P < 0.01) in range bison than in feedlot bison and were greater (P < 0.01) in SS of range beef cattle than in feedlot steers. Muscles of elk and range bison were similar (P > 0.05) in SAT. In LD, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were highest (P < 0.01) for elk and range bison and lowest (P < 0.01) for feedlot steers within each muscle. Range bison and range beef cows had greater (P < 0.01) PUFA in LD and ST than feedlot bison or steers, respectively. Range-fed animals had higher (P < 0.01) n-3 fatty acids than feedlot-fed animals or chicken breast. Chicken breast n-6 fatty acids were greater (P < 0.01) than for muscles from bison, beef, or elk. Elk had higher (P < 0.01) n-6 fatty acids than bison or beef cattle; however, range-fed animals had higher (P < 0,01) n-6 fatty acids than feedlot-fed animals in ST. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, 18:2cis9, trans-11) in LD was greatest (P < 0.01) for range beef cows (0.4%), and lowest for chicken breast and elk (mean = 0.1%). In ST, CLA was greatest (P < 0.01) for range and feedlot bison and range beef cows (mean = 0.4%) and lowest for elk and chicken breast (mean = 0.1%). Also, SS CLA was greatest (P < 0.01) for range beef cows (0.5%) and lowest for chicken breast (0.1%). Mean total fatty acid concentration (g/100 g tissue) for all muscles was highest (P < 0.01) for feedlot bison and feedlot cattle and lowest (P < 0.01) for range bison, range beef cows, elk, and chicken. Chicken breast cholesterol (mg/100 g tissue) was higher (P < 0.01) than LD and ST cholesterol, which were lowest (P < 0.01; 43.8) for range bison and intermediate for the other species. Cholesterol in SS was highest (P < 0.01) for feedlot bison and steers, which were similar to chicken breast (mean = 61.2 vs 52.8 for the mean of the other species). We conclude that lipid composition of bison muscle varies with feeding regimen, and range-fed bison had muscle lipid composition similar to that of forage-fed beef cows and wild elk.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11695/6334
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