Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) dry-cured ham is the most important product in the Italian pig breeding industry, mainly oriented to produce heavy pig carcasses to obtain hams of the right weight and maturity. Recently, along with the traditional traits swine breeding programs have aimed to include novel carcass traits. The identification at the genome level of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting such new traits helps to reveal their genetic determinism and may provide information to be integrated in prediction models in order to improve prediction accuracy as well as to identify candidate genes underlying such traits. This study aimed to estimate genetic parameters and perform a single step genome wide association studies (ssGWAS) on novel carcass traits such as untrimmed (UTW) and trimmed thigh weight (TTW) in two pig crossbred lines approved for the ham production of the Italian PDO. With this purpose, phenotypes were collected from ~1800 animals and 240 pigs were genotyped with Illumina PorcineSNP60 Beadchip. The single-step genomic BLUP procedure was used for the heritability estimation and to implement the ssGWAS. QTL were characterized based on the variance of 10-SNP sliding window genomic estimated breeding values. Moderate heritabilities were detected and QTL signals were identified on chromosome 1, 4, 6, 7, 11 and 15 for both traits. As expected, the genetic correlation among the two traits was very high (~0.99). The QTL regions encompassed a total of 249 unique candidate genes, some of which were already reported in association with growth, carcass or ham weight traits in pigs. Although independent studies are required to further verify our findings and disentangle the possible effects of specific linkage disequilibrium in our population, our results support the potential use of such new QTL information in future breeding programs to improve the reliability of genomic prediction.

Single-step genome wide association study identifies qtl signals for untrimmed and trimmed thigh weight in italian crossbred pigs for dry-cured ham production

Palombo V.;D'andrea M.
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) dry-cured ham is the most important product in the Italian pig breeding industry, mainly oriented to produce heavy pig carcasses to obtain hams of the right weight and maturity. Recently, along with the traditional traits swine breeding programs have aimed to include novel carcass traits. The identification at the genome level of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting such new traits helps to reveal their genetic determinism and may provide information to be integrated in prediction models in order to improve prediction accuracy as well as to identify candidate genes underlying such traits. This study aimed to estimate genetic parameters and perform a single step genome wide association studies (ssGWAS) on novel carcass traits such as untrimmed (UTW) and trimmed thigh weight (TTW) in two pig crossbred lines approved for the ham production of the Italian PDO. With this purpose, phenotypes were collected from ~1800 animals and 240 pigs were genotyped with Illumina PorcineSNP60 Beadchip. The single-step genomic BLUP procedure was used for the heritability estimation and to implement the ssGWAS. QTL were characterized based on the variance of 10-SNP sliding window genomic estimated breeding values. Moderate heritabilities were detected and QTL signals were identified on chromosome 1, 4, 6, 7, 11 and 15 for both traits. As expected, the genetic correlation among the two traits was very high (~0.99). The QTL regions encompassed a total of 249 unique candidate genes, some of which were already reported in association with growth, carcass or ham weight traits in pigs. Although independent studies are required to further verify our findings and disentangle the possible effects of specific linkage disequilibrium in our population, our results support the potential use of such new QTL information in future breeding programs to improve the reliability of genomic prediction.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11695/99740
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