Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients are often treated by dermatology and rheumatology specialities and may receive different treatments. To evaluate the impact of dermatology/rheumatology specialist settings on diagnosis and therapeutic approach in PsA patients. This cross-sectional multicounty study in Italy involved twenty-eight rheumatology or dermatology clinics. Patients with suspected or confirmed PsA were examined by both a dermatologist and a rheumatologist. A total of 413 patients were enrolled and 347 (84%) were diagnosed with PsA. The majority of patients were enrolled from a rheumatology setting (N = 224, 64.6%). Patients with PsA in the dermatology settings had significantly higher disease activity, including skin involvement and musculoskeletal symptoms. Time from PsA onset to diagnosis was 22.3 ± 53.8 vs. 39.4 ± 77.5 months (p = 0.63) in rheumatology and dermatology settings; time from diagnosis to initiation of csDMARD was 7.3 ± 27.5 vs. 19.5 ± 50.6 months, respectively (p < 0.001). In contrast, time from diagnosis to bDMARD use was shorter in dermatology settings (54.9 ± 69 vs. 44.2 ± 65.6 months, p = 0.09, rheumatology vs. dermatology), similar to the time taken from first csDMARDs and bDMARDs (48.7 ± 67.9 vs. 35.3 ± 51.9 months, p = 0.34). The choice to visit a rheumatologist over a dermatologist was positively associated with female gender and swollen joints and negatively associated with delay in time from musculoskeletal symptom onset to PsA diagnosis. This study highlights a diagnostic delay emerging from both settings with significantly different therapeutic approaches. Our data reinforce the importance of implementing efficient strategies to improve early identification of PsA that can benefit from the integrated management of PsA patients.Key Points• A diagnostic delay was observed from both dermatology and rheumatology settings with significantly different therapeutic approaches.•Shared dermatology and rheumatology clinics offer the combined expertise to improve in the early identification and management of PsA.

Management of psoriatic arthritis in rheumatology and dermatology settings: sub-analysis of the Italian population from the international LOOP study

Lubrano di Scorpaniello E.;Romanelli M.;Longhi M.;Di Nuzzo S.;
2020

Abstract

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients are often treated by dermatology and rheumatology specialities and may receive different treatments. To evaluate the impact of dermatology/rheumatology specialist settings on diagnosis and therapeutic approach in PsA patients. This cross-sectional multicounty study in Italy involved twenty-eight rheumatology or dermatology clinics. Patients with suspected or confirmed PsA were examined by both a dermatologist and a rheumatologist. A total of 413 patients were enrolled and 347 (84%) were diagnosed with PsA. The majority of patients were enrolled from a rheumatology setting (N = 224, 64.6%). Patients with PsA in the dermatology settings had significantly higher disease activity, including skin involvement and musculoskeletal symptoms. Time from PsA onset to diagnosis was 22.3 ± 53.8 vs. 39.4 ± 77.5 months (p = 0.63) in rheumatology and dermatology settings; time from diagnosis to initiation of csDMARD was 7.3 ± 27.5 vs. 19.5 ± 50.6 months, respectively (p < 0.001). In contrast, time from diagnosis to bDMARD use was shorter in dermatology settings (54.9 ± 69 vs. 44.2 ± 65.6 months, p = 0.09, rheumatology vs. dermatology), similar to the time taken from first csDMARDs and bDMARDs (48.7 ± 67.9 vs. 35.3 ± 51.9 months, p = 0.34). The choice to visit a rheumatologist over a dermatologist was positively associated with female gender and swollen joints and negatively associated with delay in time from musculoskeletal symptom onset to PsA diagnosis. This study highlights a diagnostic delay emerging from both settings with significantly different therapeutic approaches. Our data reinforce the importance of implementing efficient strategies to improve early identification of PsA that can benefit from the integrated management of PsA patients.Key Points• A diagnostic delay was observed from both dermatology and rheumatology settings with significantly different therapeutic approaches.•Shared dermatology and rheumatology clinics offer the combined expertise to improve in the early identification and management of PsA.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11695/96148
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact