Classical organic acidemias (OAs) result from defective mitochondrial catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). Abnormal mitochondrial function relates to oxidative stress, ectopic lipids and insulin resistance (IR). We investigated whether genetically impaired function of mitochondrial BCAA catabolism associates with cardiometabolic risk factors, altered liver and muscle energy metabolism, and IR. In this case-control study, 31 children and young adults with propionic acidemia (PA), methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) or isovaleric acidemia (IVA) were compared with 30 healthy young humans using comprehensive metabolic phenotyping including in vivo 31P/1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and skeletal muscle. Among all OAs, patients with PA exhibited abdominal adiposity, IR, fasting hyperglycaemia and hypertriglyceridemia as well as increased liver fat accumulation, despite dietary energy intake within recommendations for age and sex. In contrast, patients with MMA more frequently featured higher energy intake than recommended and had a different phenotype including hepatomegaly and mildly lower skeletal muscle ATP content. In skeletal muscle of patients with PA, slightly lower inorganic phosphate levels were found. However, hepatic ATP and inorganic phosphate concentrations were not different between all OA patients and controls. In patients with IVA, no abnormalities were detected. Impaired BCAA catabolism in PA, but not in MMA or IVA, was associated with a previously unrecognised, metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with abdominal adiposity potentially resulting from ectopic lipid storage. These findings suggest the need for early cardiometabolic risk factor screening in PA.

Cardiometabolic risk factor clustering in patients with deficient branched-chain amino acid catabolism: A case-control study

Santoro N.;
2020

Abstract

Classical organic acidemias (OAs) result from defective mitochondrial catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). Abnormal mitochondrial function relates to oxidative stress, ectopic lipids and insulin resistance (IR). We investigated whether genetically impaired function of mitochondrial BCAA catabolism associates with cardiometabolic risk factors, altered liver and muscle energy metabolism, and IR. In this case-control study, 31 children and young adults with propionic acidemia (PA), methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) or isovaleric acidemia (IVA) were compared with 30 healthy young humans using comprehensive metabolic phenotyping including in vivo 31P/1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and skeletal muscle. Among all OAs, patients with PA exhibited abdominal adiposity, IR, fasting hyperglycaemia and hypertriglyceridemia as well as increased liver fat accumulation, despite dietary energy intake within recommendations for age and sex. In contrast, patients with MMA more frequently featured higher energy intake than recommended and had a different phenotype including hepatomegaly and mildly lower skeletal muscle ATP content. In skeletal muscle of patients with PA, slightly lower inorganic phosphate levels were found. However, hepatic ATP and inorganic phosphate concentrations were not different between all OA patients and controls. In patients with IVA, no abnormalities were detected. Impaired BCAA catabolism in PA, but not in MMA or IVA, was associated with a previously unrecognised, metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with abdominal adiposity potentially resulting from ectopic lipid storage. These findings suggest the need for early cardiometabolic risk factor screening in PA.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11695/93502
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