Metal(loid) accumulation in soils, is of increasing concern because of the potential human health risks. Therefore, metal(loid) contaminated sites need rehabilitation. It is becoming increasingly popular to use phytoremediation methods for the reclamation of sites containing metal(loid)s. However, plant establishment and growth on contaminated soils can be difficult due to high metal(loid) concentrations and poor fertility conditions. Consequently, amendments, like biochar and iron sulphate, must be applied. Biochar, obtained from plant biomass or animal wastes pyrolyzed under minimal oxygen supply, showed beneficial effects on soil properties and plant growth. Iron sulphate can effectively immobilize anions, thus mitigating metal(loid) toxicity and hence promoting plant development. This study aimed to assess the effect of two different modalities of biochar amendment application (top third of the tube and all tube height) combined with iron sulphate addition on the physico-chemical properties of a mining polluted soil and the growth and metal(loid) uptake of three Salicaceae species. A 1.5 year mesocosm experiment under field condition was conducted using a former tin mine contaminated by arsenic, amended with biochar and iron sulphate and vegetated with three Salicaceae species. Results showed that the combination of biochar and iron sulphate improved soil characteristics by increasing pH and electrical conductivity and reducing soil pore water metal(loid) concentrations. Between the two biochar application methods, the addition of biochar on the all tube height showed better results. But for such contaminated soil, biochar, in combination with iron sulphate, had no positive effect on plant growth, for all species tested and especially when incorporating on the top third of the tube. Finally, S. purpurea presented high root metal(loid) concentrations associated to the better growth compared to P. euramericana and S. viminalis, making it a better candidate for phytostabilization of the studied soil.

Assisted phytoremediation of a former mine soil using biochar and iron sulphate: Effects on As soil immobilization and accumulation in three Salicaceae species

Simiele M.;Lebrun M.;Trupiano D.;Scippa G. S.;Morabito D.
2020-01-01

Abstract

Metal(loid) accumulation in soils, is of increasing concern because of the potential human health risks. Therefore, metal(loid) contaminated sites need rehabilitation. It is becoming increasingly popular to use phytoremediation methods for the reclamation of sites containing metal(loid)s. However, plant establishment and growth on contaminated soils can be difficult due to high metal(loid) concentrations and poor fertility conditions. Consequently, amendments, like biochar and iron sulphate, must be applied. Biochar, obtained from plant biomass or animal wastes pyrolyzed under minimal oxygen supply, showed beneficial effects on soil properties and plant growth. Iron sulphate can effectively immobilize anions, thus mitigating metal(loid) toxicity and hence promoting plant development. This study aimed to assess the effect of two different modalities of biochar amendment application (top third of the tube and all tube height) combined with iron sulphate addition on the physico-chemical properties of a mining polluted soil and the growth and metal(loid) uptake of three Salicaceae species. A 1.5 year mesocosm experiment under field condition was conducted using a former tin mine contaminated by arsenic, amended with biochar and iron sulphate and vegetated with three Salicaceae species. Results showed that the combination of biochar and iron sulphate improved soil characteristics by increasing pH and electrical conductivity and reducing soil pore water metal(loid) concentrations. Between the two biochar application methods, the addition of biochar on the all tube height showed better results. But for such contaminated soil, biochar, in combination with iron sulphate, had no positive effect on plant growth, for all species tested and especially when incorporating on the top third of the tube. Finally, S. purpurea presented high root metal(loid) concentrations associated to the better growth compared to P. euramericana and S. viminalis, making it a better candidate for phytostabilization of the studied soil.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11695/91692
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