Changes in voltage-dependent gating represent a common pathogenetic mechanism for genetically inherited channelopathies, such as benign familial neonatal seizures or peripheral nerve hyperexcitability caused by mutations in neuronal K(v)7.2 channels. Mutation-induced changes in channel voltage dependence are most often inferred from macroscopic current measurements, a technique unable to provide a detailed assessment of the structural rearrangements underlying channel gating behavior; by contrast, gating currents directly measure voltage-sensor displacement during voltage-dependent gating. In this work, we describe macroscopic and gating current measurements, together with molecular modeling and molecular-dynamics simulations, from channels carrying mutations responsible for benign familial neonatal seizures and/or peripheral nerve hyperexcitability; K(v)7.4 channels, highly related to K(v)7.2 channels both functionally and structurally, were used for these experiments. The data obtained showed that mutations affecting charged residues located in the more distal portion of S-4 decrease the stability of the open state and the active voltage-sensing domain configuration but do not directly participate in voltage sensing, whereas mutations affecting a residue (R4) located more proximally in S-4 caused activation of gating-pore currents at depolarized potentials. These results reveal that distinct molecular mechanisms underlie the altered gating behavior of channels carrying disease-causing mutations at different voltage-sensing domain locations, thereby expanding our current view of the pathogenesis of neuronal hyperexcitability diseases.

Gating Currents from K(v)7 Channels Carrying Neuronal Hyperexcitability Mutations in the Voltage-Sensing Domain

TAGLIALATELA, Maurizio
2012

Abstract

Changes in voltage-dependent gating represent a common pathogenetic mechanism for genetically inherited channelopathies, such as benign familial neonatal seizures or peripheral nerve hyperexcitability caused by mutations in neuronal K(v)7.2 channels. Mutation-induced changes in channel voltage dependence are most often inferred from macroscopic current measurements, a technique unable to provide a detailed assessment of the structural rearrangements underlying channel gating behavior; by contrast, gating currents directly measure voltage-sensor displacement during voltage-dependent gating. In this work, we describe macroscopic and gating current measurements, together with molecular modeling and molecular-dynamics simulations, from channels carrying mutations responsible for benign familial neonatal seizures and/or peripheral nerve hyperexcitability; K(v)7.4 channels, highly related to K(v)7.2 channels both functionally and structurally, were used for these experiments. The data obtained showed that mutations affecting charged residues located in the more distal portion of S-4 decrease the stability of the open state and the active voltage-sensing domain configuration but do not directly participate in voltage sensing, whereas mutations affecting a residue (R4) located more proximally in S-4 caused activation of gating-pore currents at depolarized potentials. These results reveal that distinct molecular mechanisms underlie the altered gating behavior of channels carrying disease-causing mutations at different voltage-sensing domain locations, thereby expanding our current view of the pathogenesis of neuronal hyperexcitability diseases.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11695/4647
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