"Water-in-olive-oil emulsion stability was studied. as a function of the composition of the water dispersed. phase. In particular, different polyphenolic extracts from. natural sources were dispersed in the olive oil and their. impact on emulsion kinetic stability and susceptibility to. oxidation was evaluated. As natural sources, extra virgin. olive oil, olive mill waste and green tea leaves were chosen.. To test their impact on emulsion properties, the. emulsions were prepared with fixed aqueous phase content.. As emulsifiers, a fixed percentage of a mixture Span 80. (sorbitan monoleate)\/Tween 80 (polysorbate 80) was used.. The effect of the antioxidant dispersion on emulsion oxidation. was studied by triggering the oxidation reaction in. the oil phase with the lipophilic radical initiator AMVN. (2,2-azobis(2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile). Then, the oxidation. reaction was followed by using diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine,. which becomes fluorescent when it is oxidized by. hydroperoxides. The impact of antioxidant dispersions on. emulsion kinetic stability was studied by UV–Vis turbidity. measurements. The oxidation results were correlated to. antioxidant extracts oxygen radical adsorption capacity. (ORAC) and to emulsion kinetic stability. On the whole,. antioxidants dispersions delayed the oxidation reaction to. different extents in dependence on their ORAC values and. their components amphiphilicity. Remarkably, among the. antioxidants tested, the aqueous polyphenol extract from. virgin olive oil was the most effective because it protected. emulsions both from oxidation and from phase separation.. Additionally, from this set of experiments, the primary role. of the interfacial properties of olive oil polyphenols was. highlighted."

Impact of antioxidants dispersions on the stability and oxidation of water -in-olive oil emulsions

LOPEZ, Francesco;AMBROSONE, Luigi;CEGLIE, Andrea
2013

Abstract

"Water-in-olive-oil emulsion stability was studied. as a function of the composition of the water dispersed. phase. In particular, different polyphenolic extracts from. natural sources were dispersed in the olive oil and their. impact on emulsion kinetic stability and susceptibility to. oxidation was evaluated. As natural sources, extra virgin. olive oil, olive mill waste and green tea leaves were chosen.. To test their impact on emulsion properties, the. emulsions were prepared with fixed aqueous phase content.. As emulsifiers, a fixed percentage of a mixture Span 80. (sorbitan monoleate)\/Tween 80 (polysorbate 80) was used.. The effect of the antioxidant dispersion on emulsion oxidation. was studied by triggering the oxidation reaction in. the oil phase with the lipophilic radical initiator AMVN. (2,2-azobis(2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile). Then, the oxidation. reaction was followed by using diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine,. which becomes fluorescent when it is oxidized by. hydroperoxides. The impact of antioxidant dispersions on. emulsion kinetic stability was studied by UV–Vis turbidity. measurements. The oxidation results were correlated to. antioxidant extracts oxygen radical adsorption capacity. (ORAC) and to emulsion kinetic stability. On the whole,. antioxidants dispersions delayed the oxidation reaction to. different extents in dependence on their ORAC values and. their components amphiphilicity. Remarkably, among the. antioxidants tested, the aqueous polyphenol extract from. virgin olive oil was the most effective because it protected. emulsions both from oxidation and from phase separation.. Additionally, from this set of experiments, the primary role. of the interfacial properties of olive oil polyphenols was. highlighted."
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11695/4084
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