Italian university students were investigated for: sources of information about HIV, knowledge of HIV risk behavior, as well as sexual behaviours and condom use. A self completed anonymous questionnaire was administered to 430 university students in Campobasso, Italy (mean age 23,1; males 35,8%). Although TV, radio and pointed press were the most common sources of HIV information (>60% of respondents), most respondents preferred to receive information from physicians or resources centers (50 and 51%). Most students (>97%) were aware that specific sexual behaviours (unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse) and sharing of needles with illegal injecting drug users could transmit HIV. Most students (>50%) did not regularly use condoms (despite understanding their protective effect), and continued to engage in behaviours considered risky. Males were significantly more likely than females to engage in vaginal sex (84 vs. 67%) or anal sex (37 vs. 13%) with both regular and casual partners. Although knowledge of HIV in itself is not enough to produce behavior change, increases in students’ level of knowledge may be useful.

Source of information, knowledge and sexual behavior related to HIV/AIDS among university students in an inland territory in central Italy

FERRUCCI, Fabio;GRASSO G. M.;RIPABELLI, Giancarlo;SAMMARCO, Michela Lucia
2007

Abstract

Italian university students were investigated for: sources of information about HIV, knowledge of HIV risk behavior, as well as sexual behaviours and condom use. A self completed anonymous questionnaire was administered to 430 university students in Campobasso, Italy (mean age 23,1; males 35,8%). Although TV, radio and pointed press were the most common sources of HIV information (>60% of respondents), most respondents preferred to receive information from physicians or resources centers (50 and 51%). Most students (>97%) were aware that specific sexual behaviours (unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse) and sharing of needles with illegal injecting drug users could transmit HIV. Most students (>50%) did not regularly use condoms (despite understanding their protective effect), and continued to engage in behaviours considered risky. Males were significantly more likely than females to engage in vaginal sex (84 vs. 67%) or anal sex (37 vs. 13%) with both regular and casual partners. Although knowledge of HIV in itself is not enough to produce behavior change, increases in students’ level of knowledge may be useful.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11695/3456
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact