Cardopatum corymbosum is a perennial hemicryptophyta species living on erosion-prone steep slopes where it forms very small, scattered communities that resist soil erosion. The aim of this study was to understand better the life cycle of this species before suggesting its use for eco-engineering purposes to stop soil erosion. We examined anatomical preparations with a light microscope, and plant anatomy was reconstructed by examining sequential cross sections of the stem cut from the shoot apex to the root collar. A single sprout above the root collar produces a rosette of leaves at the beginning of spring and a floral axis at the end of summer. The leaves and the floral axis die at the end of summer, whereas the basal portion of the new stem remains alive and forms, together with the root system, the perennial portion of this plant. This stem zone is named ‘‘transition zone’’ and presents leaf traces converging in the centre where they give rise to a vascular cylinder with a cambium ring dividing a secondary xylem from a secondary phloem. New buds form in the cortex of the transition zone that are quiescent and are not visible externally until the following spring when they resume growth and generate a new sprout. These buds should be considered adventitious because: (1) they form independently of leaves; and (2) their annual production could represent the plant’s response to ensure its survival after the loss of the above-ground portion of the stem. Given the efficient resprouting strategy coupled with a perennial root system, C. corymbosum is a good candidate for bioengineering applications against the soil erosion typical of steep slopes in Mediterranean climates. This species could be considered for intensive re-vegetation in order to produce a protective soil covering.

Anatomical investigations of resprouting in Cardopatum corymbosum L. (Asteraceae): a hemicryptophyta living on erosion-prone slopes in a Mediterranean climate

SCIPPA, Gabriella;
2008

Abstract

Cardopatum corymbosum is a perennial hemicryptophyta species living on erosion-prone steep slopes where it forms very small, scattered communities that resist soil erosion. The aim of this study was to understand better the life cycle of this species before suggesting its use for eco-engineering purposes to stop soil erosion. We examined anatomical preparations with a light microscope, and plant anatomy was reconstructed by examining sequential cross sections of the stem cut from the shoot apex to the root collar. A single sprout above the root collar produces a rosette of leaves at the beginning of spring and a floral axis at the end of summer. The leaves and the floral axis die at the end of summer, whereas the basal portion of the new stem remains alive and forms, together with the root system, the perennial portion of this plant. This stem zone is named ‘‘transition zone’’ and presents leaf traces converging in the centre where they give rise to a vascular cylinder with a cambium ring dividing a secondary xylem from a secondary phloem. New buds form in the cortex of the transition zone that are quiescent and are not visible externally until the following spring when they resume growth and generate a new sprout. These buds should be considered adventitious because: (1) they form independently of leaves; and (2) their annual production could represent the plant’s response to ensure its survival after the loss of the above-ground portion of the stem. Given the efficient resprouting strategy coupled with a perennial root system, C. corymbosum is a good candidate for bioengineering applications against the soil erosion typical of steep slopes in Mediterranean climates. This species could be considered for intensive re-vegetation in order to produce a protective soil covering.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11695/3446
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