Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of liver disease and is often the precursor for more serious liver conditions such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Although the gut microbiome has been implicated in the development of NAFLD, the strong association of obesity with NAFLD and its effect on microbiome structure has made interpreting study outcomes difficult. In the present study, we examined the taxonomic and functional differences between the microbiomes of youth with obesity and with and without NAFLD. Shotgun metagenome sequencing was performed to profile the microbiomes of 36 subjects, half of whom were diagnosed with NAFLD using abdominal magnetic resonance imaging. Beta diversity analysis showed community-wide differences between the groups (p = 0.002). Specific taxonomic differences included increased relative abundances of the species Fusicatenibacter saccharivorans (p = 0.042), Romboutsia ilealis (p = 0.046), and Actinomyces sp. ICM47 (p = 0.0009), and a decrease of Bacteroides thetaiotamicron (p = 0.0002), in the NAFLD group as compared with the non-NAFLD group. At the phylum level, Bacteroidetes (p < 0.0001) was decreased in the NAFLD group. Functionally, branched-chain amino acid (p = 0.01343) and aromatic amino acid (p = 0.01343) synthesis pathways had increased relative abundances in the NAFLD group along with numerous energy use pathways, including pyruvate fermentation to acetate (p = 0.01318). Conclusion: Community-wide differences were noted based on NAFLD status, and individual bacterial species along with specific metabolic pathways were identified as potential drivers of these differences. The results of the present study support the idea that the NAFLD phenotype displays a differentiated microbial and functional signature from the obesity phenotype.

Insights from shotgun metagenomics into bacterial species and metabolic pathways associated with NAFLD in obese youth

Santoro N.
2022-01-01

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of liver disease and is often the precursor for more serious liver conditions such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Although the gut microbiome has been implicated in the development of NAFLD, the strong association of obesity with NAFLD and its effect on microbiome structure has made interpreting study outcomes difficult. In the present study, we examined the taxonomic and functional differences between the microbiomes of youth with obesity and with and without NAFLD. Shotgun metagenome sequencing was performed to profile the microbiomes of 36 subjects, half of whom were diagnosed with NAFLD using abdominal magnetic resonance imaging. Beta diversity analysis showed community-wide differences between the groups (p = 0.002). Specific taxonomic differences included increased relative abundances of the species Fusicatenibacter saccharivorans (p = 0.042), Romboutsia ilealis (p = 0.046), and Actinomyces sp. ICM47 (p = 0.0009), and a decrease of Bacteroides thetaiotamicron (p = 0.0002), in the NAFLD group as compared with the non-NAFLD group. At the phylum level, Bacteroidetes (p < 0.0001) was decreased in the NAFLD group. Functionally, branched-chain amino acid (p = 0.01343) and aromatic amino acid (p = 0.01343) synthesis pathways had increased relative abundances in the NAFLD group along with numerous energy use pathways, including pyruvate fermentation to acetate (p = 0.01318). Conclusion: Community-wide differences were noted based on NAFLD status, and individual bacterial species along with specific metabolic pathways were identified as potential drivers of these differences. The results of the present study support the idea that the NAFLD phenotype displays a differentiated microbial and functional signature from the obesity phenotype.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11695/108119
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