Suicide is one of the most important causes of death in the age group 15-34 and ranks as the second cause of death after traffic accidents and other injuries in the ages 15-19. Research shows that youth suicide almost always occurs in the context of an active, often treatable, mental illness, such as depression that has frequently gone unrecognized or untreated. Depression is linked also with other kind of self-destructive and risk-taking behavior besides suicidal behaviour, for example bullying, unprotected sexual behaviour, substance use. Psychosocial factors are also linked to risk-taking behaviours that may be considered as suicidal equivalents. During the transition from childhood to adulthood, adolescents establish patterns of behaviour and make lifestyle choices that affect both their current and future health. Adolescents’ egocentrism leads them to believe that everyone is concerned with their well-being; their sense of invulnerability allows them to take risks without believing that these risks can affect their future. They test their limits when engaging in risk behaviours forging their identities. Serious health and safety issues such as motor vehicle crashes, violence, substance abuse, and promiscuous sexual behaviours adversely affect adolescents and young adults. Not eating nutritiously, not engaging in physical activity, and choosing to use alcohol, drugs and tobacco increase the risk of developing health problems in adulthood. Therefore these behaviours, which are associated with the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, remain a major problem among adolescents and need to be prevented.

What’s in young’s mind

SARCHIAPONE, Marco
2009

Abstract

Suicide is one of the most important causes of death in the age group 15-34 and ranks as the second cause of death after traffic accidents and other injuries in the ages 15-19. Research shows that youth suicide almost always occurs in the context of an active, often treatable, mental illness, such as depression that has frequently gone unrecognized or untreated. Depression is linked also with other kind of self-destructive and risk-taking behavior besides suicidal behaviour, for example bullying, unprotected sexual behaviour, substance use. Psychosocial factors are also linked to risk-taking behaviours that may be considered as suicidal equivalents. During the transition from childhood to adulthood, adolescents establish patterns of behaviour and make lifestyle choices that affect both their current and future health. Adolescents’ egocentrism leads them to believe that everyone is concerned with their well-being; their sense of invulnerability allows them to take risks without believing that these risks can affect their future. They test their limits when engaging in risk behaviours forging their identities. Serious health and safety issues such as motor vehicle crashes, violence, substance abuse, and promiscuous sexual behaviours adversely affect adolescents and young adults. Not eating nutritiously, not engaging in physical activity, and choosing to use alcohol, drugs and tobacco increase the risk of developing health problems in adulthood. Therefore these behaviours, which are associated with the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, remain a major problem among adolescents and need to be prevented.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11695/15526
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